Tullie House Museum collects and preserves objects and information concerning the wildlife and geology of Cumbria.

The museum holds large and important collections of zoological, botanical and geological material.

Tullie House Museum also maintains a local biological records database with over 200,000 records of wildlife sightings in Cumbria.

A display of the wildlife of the area from the Lakeland and Pennine fells to the Solway Firth can be seen in our Wildlife Gallery.

The Carlisle Millennium Gallery houses a display of some of the beautiful and spectacular Cumbrian mineral crystals from our collections.

Our Special Exhibitions Programme regularly features shows on various aspect of the wildlife and geology of the region and further afield.

 

Invertebrates

Drawer of beetle species

Insect Collections The Entomology collections contain some 100,000 specimens, covering most British insect Orders. The bulk of this derives from the collections of three local amateur entomologists - G.B. Routledge (1864-1934), J. Murray (1872-1942) and F.H. Day (1875-1963). All three collected a...

Geology

Erythrite from the North Pennines

Mineral Collections The Local Minerals collection is of considerable quality, and contains some 2,000 specimens. This reflects the fact that Cumbria is one of the richest mining areas in Britain. In particular, the Caldbeck Fells near Carlisle are renowned world-wide for their mineral wealth and...

Vertebrates

Fox (Vulpes vulpes)

The comprehensive collection of around 1500 mounted British birds and mammals lacks representatives of just a few species. The collection derives mainly from Victorian naturalists and includes several notable bequest and gifts - namely the Rev. H.A. Macpherson collection, J.W. Harris collection,...

Botany Collection

Brittle bladder fern (Cystopteris fragilis)

The collections consist mainly of study material of flowering plants, ferns, mosses, and seaweeds, amounting to some 24,000 specimens. About 30 individual collections are represented. Some of the earliest material is the Stevens Lakeland collection, of mid-nineteenth century origin. Other important...

Wildlife Records

Wildlife Records Tullie House Museum established what may be the first ever local biological records centre in 1902 at the instigation of the curator at the time - Linnaeus Eden Hope - and Carlisle Natural History Society. Today the Museum hosts Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre (CBDC), which holds...

Carlisle Natural History Society

  Go to Carlisle Natural History Society website http://www.carlislenats.org.uk Carlisle Natural History Society, established in 1893, has been studying the wildlife of Cumbria for over 100 years. The society aims to encourage the study, enjoyment and knowledge of the animals and plants of Cumbria...

Curator

Simon Jackson

Keeper of Natural Sciences

Simon Jackson can answer enquiries regarding the natural history of Cumbria and information on the work of the Natural Sciences section.

Enquiries

E-mail: enquiries@tulliehouse.co.uk
Telephone: (01228) 618736

External links