Tullie House’s large collection of Roman artefacts includes an internationally important set of organic (mostly wooden and leather) objects from excavations of the fort and town located under present day Carlisle, as well as an outstanding collection of inscribed and sculptured stones. The museum also has collections originating from the Cumbrian sections of Hadrian’s Wall. The museum also holds a small number of Roman writing tablets, including what may be the first written reference ever found naming the province as ‘Britannia’. Material is held from both the fort and town at Carlisle and from the forts at the western end of Hadrian’s Wall, comprising a wide range of military and domestic items. There is also a fine collection of religious material, including statues, figurines and plaques, representing both classical Roman gods and local Celtic deities.

The Roman displays can be seen in the Border Galleries, where there is a full-height reconstruction of a section of Hadrian’s Wall.

Roman Carlisle

The museum has collected material relating to the Roman city of Luguvalium Carvettiorum (Carlisle) since it opened in 1893. One of the core elements of the collection is the material that was found when the foundations were dug for the Victorian extension to the museum. This tradition continued...

Hadrian's Wall Frontier of an Empire

Openwork armour fitting showing Jupiter's eagle

When it was built, Hadrian’s Wall represented the far northern edge of the colossal Roman Empire. Tullie House has the largest collection of finds from the western end of the Hadrian’s Wall. The frontier was first established along the line that was called the Stanegate (stone street) in Medieval...

Roman Inscriptions and Sculpture

Tullie House has an internationally important collection of Roman inscriptions. Many of the inscriptions refer to sites along Hadrian’s Wall and are part of the backbone of dating evidence for the Roman northern frontier. They provide a wealth of information about the troops stationed on the Wall,...