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Painting, Nature Painting, Keith Tyson (1969-)

  • Nature Painting, 2008 Keith Tyson (1969-)

More Info

Nature Painting is part of a major series of work produced by Tyson from 2006-2008. In this painting Tyson explores how making art can communicate the complex nature of the world. The swirling forms have associations with cosmology, atomic physics, meteorology and topography but defy any single interpretation or categorisation. The painting makes visual allusions to the natural world – including geological strata and cosmology – achieved by chance rather than skill. Previously artists were valued for their skilled representation of the physical world. But here Tyson has replaced skill with chance. The forms and colours are determined, not by the artist’s hand, but by reactions between specially mixed paints and chemicals poured at different angles and temperatures onto an aluminium plate.

Keith Tyson is a major British contemporary artist and the foremost living artist to have emerged from Cumbria. In 2002 he won the prestigious Turner Prize. Tyson was born in Ulverston and attributes his love of the natural world to his Cumbrian upbringing. Although Tyson is a conceptual artist he creates works which are visually beautiful that we can all relate to.

Key facts: 
  • Tyson explores patterns and occurences found in landscape, weather, atomic physics and the wider universe by using paints, and chemicals on an aluminium base to make patterns
  • By specially mixing paints, and heating chemicals to different temperatures, he deliberately allows the patterns to form by chance rather than design, as is often the case in nature
  • Keith Tyson has won the prestigious Turner prize, and is an important contemporary artist

Curator: Melanie

Role: 
Fine and Decorative Art

I’m responsible for the art collections in the museum which cover fine art (paintings, watercolours, drawings, prints, sculpture) dating from 1650

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